The Latest: Newtown mom backs ruling against gun maker

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo, firearms training unit Detective Barbara J. Mattson, of the Connecticut State Police, holds a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, the same make and model used by Adam Lanza in the 2012 Sandy Hook School shooting, during a hearing at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford, Conn. A divided Connecticut Supreme Court ruled, Thursday, March 14, 2019, gun maker Remington can be sued over how it marketed the Bushmaster rifle used in the massacre. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)

HARTFORD, Conn. — The Latest on a Connecticut court reinstating part of a wrongful death lawsuit filed by victims of the Newtown school shooting against gun maker Remington (all times local):

1:40 p.m.

The mother of one of the 20 children killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting says a new court ruling is a step toward holding gun-maker Remington accountable for the way it marketed the rifle used in the massacre.

Nicole Hockley said Thursday that Remington and other gun makers need to stop gearing their advertising toward troubled young men.

Phone and email messages have been left for Remington officials and lawyers.

The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Thursday Remington could be sued over how it marketed the Bushmaster rifle used by a 20-year-old man with mental health problems to kill 20 first-graders and six educators at the Newtown school in 2012.

A lower court judge had dismissed the lawsuit filed by Hockley and other parents, citing a 2005 federal law that shields gun manufacturers from liability when their products are used in crimes.

____

11:47 a.m.

A divided Connecticut Supreme Court has ruled gun-maker Remington can be sued over how it marketed the Bushmaster rifle used to kill 20 children and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012.

Justices issued a 4-3 ruling that reinstated a wrongful death lawsuit and overturned a lower court ruling that the lawsuit was prohibited by a 2005 federal law that shields gun manufacturers from liability in most cases when their products are used in crimes.

The plaintiffs include a survivor and relatives of nine people killed in the massacre. They argue the AR-15-style rifle used by shooter Adam Lanza is too dangerous for the public and Remington glorified the weapon in marketing it to young people.

Remington has denied wrongdoing and previously insisted it can't be sued under the federal law.

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