14 worms pulled from woman's eye after rare infection

This August 2016 photo provided by Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) shows inflammation (in the circle added by the source) from the infection caused by Thelazia gulosa, a type of eye worm seen in cattle in the northern United States and southern Canada, inside of the eyelid of a woman. The Oregon woman who had worms coming out of her eye is being called the first known human case of a parasitic infection spread by flies. Fourteen tiny worms were removed from the left eye of the 26-year-old woman in August 2016. Scientists reported the case Monday, Feb. 12, 2018. (OHSU via AP)
This undated photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows Thelazia gulosa, a type of eye worm seen in cattle in the northern United States and southern Canada, but never before in humans. An Oregon woman who had worms coming out of her eye is being called the first known human case of a parasitic infection spread by flies. Fourteen tiny worms were removed from the left eye of the 26-year-old woman in August 2016. Scientists reported the case Monday, Feb. 12, 2018. (CDC via AP)

NEW YORK — An Oregon woman who had worms coming out of her eye is being called the first known human case of a parasitic infection spread by flies.

Fourteen tiny worms were removed from the left eye of the 26-year-old woman in August 2016. Scientists reported the case Monday.

The woman, Abby Beckley, was diagnosed in August 2016 with Thelazia gulosa. That's a type of eye worm seen in cattle in the northern United States and southern Canada, but never before in humans.

They are spread by a type of fly known as "face flies." The flies feed on the tears that lubricate the eyeball, scientists said.

She had been horseback riding and fishing in Gold Beach, Oregon, a coastal, cattle-farming area.

After a week of eye irritation, Beckley pulled a worm from her eye. She visited doctors, but removed most of the additional worms herself during the following few weeks.

The worms were translucent and each less than half an inch long.

After they were removed, no more worms were found and she had no additional symptoms.

Eye worms are seen in several kinds of animals, including cats and dogs. They can be spread by different kinds of flies.

Two other types of Thelazia eye worm infections had been seen in people before, but never this kind, according to Richard Bradbury of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He was the study's lead author.

The report was published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

___

This story has been corrected to reflect that the infected woman, not doctors, removed most of the worms from her eye.

Must Read

Trump accuses Obama of being the 'founder of ISIS'

Aug 11, 2016

Donald Trump accused President Barack Obama on Wednesday of establishing the Islamic State group...

Girardi: 'No one individual is ever bigger than...

Aug 11, 2016

Benched from the starting lineup once again as his finale approaches, Alex Rodriguez pinch hit and...

Teenager who scaled Trump Tower had past problems...

Aug 11, 2016

A Virginia teenager who climbed partway up Trump Tower in New York City had a history of problems...

Justice Dept. report critical of zero-tolerance...

Aug 11, 2016

To supporters, zero-tolerance policing has long represented a logical crime-fighting approach:...

Ecuador to set date for Assange to be questioned...

Aug 12, 2016

Ecuador said Thursday it's ready to set a date for Swedish prosecutors to question Julian Assange...

Sign up now!

About Us

In The Headline sought to bring professionalism back into journalism, bringing you only the most exclusive and the most impactive news from all over the globe.

Contact us: sales[at]intheheadline.com