Katie Coates Pushes Charity to Overcome Opposition to Real Estate Projects

Katie Coates, coach to real estate developers and author, has developed a program to get approval for development projects. One of the requirements is that developers commit to improving their communities.

Huntington Beach, United States - March 14, 2018 /PressCable/ —

A new book for real estate developers, “Yes Vote: The Public Hearing Plan for Developers” answers the question asked by many project managers: How to overcome opposition?

When opponents are smearing a developer’s reputation in an attempt to defeat a project, developers can take the actions that are outlined in detail in Yes Vote. These tactics work for anyone wanting to increase their odds of success in getting approval from any kind of elected or appointed board.

Katie Coates, coach to real estate developers and author, has worked with developers for more than 20 years and has helped her clients get approval at dozens of public hearings at the city council and planning commission level, as well as regional and state agencies

“Working with clients to get a Yes Vote at their public hearings has been challenging because opponents are not held to any level of truth-telling,” Katie says, “Whereas business people have to represent themselves well, or it will haunt them in the future. The misinformation that’s commonly made up by opponents to development are unconscionable and amount to fear-mongering.”

She also says that the opponents will make slurs against the developers themselves.

“The opponents oftentimes make their attacks very personal,” Katie says, “They often don’t care about the damage they might do to an individual’s reputation.”

Katie Coates helps her clients achieve success by committing to make their communities better places. A long-time volunteer, she encourages them to volunteer for charities in their cities, towns and villages. Service to a professional association or political cause, or volunteer work on behalf of animals, as noble as they are, don’t count as part of the program she has created; the volunteer work must benefit people in the community on a grassroots level.

Katie says, “Those who do volunteer work to benefit other human beings are helping all of us. By working together with community leaders, developers can find supporters, overcome opposition, and communicate more effectively with the decision makers through articulate and credible third-party messengers.”

Developers who want to schedule a complimentary session for a project evaluation with Katie can do so by visiting: https://calendly.com/katieca/50min

Katie Coates is the author of Yes Vote: The Public Hearing Plan for Developers. She helps developers get approval at public hearings as they work through the entitlement process and has obtained approvals for her clients at dozens of public hearings. She is also a lecturer at several Southern California universities on developing and implementing effective community outreach programs and crisis communications. Katie has a BA in Political Science from Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, a Certificate in Public Relations from the University of California, Irvine, and she is Accredited in Public Relations.

Contact Info:
Name: Katie Coates
Email: info@prprojects.com
Organization: PRP Press
Address: 9121 Atlanta Avenue #101, Huntington Beach, CA 92646, United States
Phone: +1-877-881-2027;ext=102

Source: PressCable

Release ID: 313759

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